Executive Recruitment

ABOUT THE AREA

Croydon

Croydon has the highest population in London with residents from a wide range of ethnic origins and cultures. In the north, Croydon is a metropolitan area whilst to the south it sprawls into green leafy suburbs. 

There is an increasing demand for mental health services (led in part by demographic changes and rapid population growth), which has led to significant pressures on inpatient beds for Croydon’s population. As a result of migration flows, Croydon’s population is likely to become more deprived.

 Over half of Croydon’s population are from black, Asian and minority ethnic groups and this proportion is increasing over time. Whilst the common mental health disorders such as anxiety and depression are projected to increase by 5% over ten years, a much greater increase is projected in people with serious mental illness.

Numbers of people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other psychoses are projected to increase by 23% by 2021. The need for mental health services varies across the borough with greater need in the north and east. Croydon has a low baseline for community services and is seeing a level of demand for talking therapies that current provision is not meeting.

Lambeth

Lambeth is a thriving central London borough with a diverse and changing population. It’s a microcosm of the global trend towards urbanisation; with population growth, successful businesses, opportunities for creativity and redevelopment abound. The borough’s patchwork of communities, town centres, neighbourhoods and open spaces all have their own story, and they all feed into why Lambeth is such a special place.

Lambeth is the 44th most deprived local authority in England and the 9th most deprived borough in London with 36.7% of the population living in the 20% most deprived areas in Lambeth and one third of families with children are in receipt of benefits. Lambeth has the fourth highest turnover of residents in England - 40,000 people leave the borough, and over 40,000 others move to the borough every year. It has a predominantly younger population, 44%, aged 20 to 39 years old compared with 27% in England.

Lambeth is ethnically diverse - 60% of Lambeth’s population describe their ethnicity as other than white British; 30% Black ethnicity compared to 17% in London. Having a multicultural community is seen by residents as one of the top most important things in making Lambeth a good place to live and community cohesion is very high.

Priorities for the borough are to continue bring investment into the borough ensuring that this helps and touches people’s lives, to tackle the inequality in the borough and the supporting strong and sustainable neighbourhoods.

Lambeth has one of the highest levels of mental illness in England. In 2013/14, 1.3% of all patients in GP practices in Lambeth were on the serious mental illness register. The English average is 0.85%. The rate of premature mortality in adults with serious mental illness is significantly lower in Lambeth at 691 per 100,000 compared to England (1319 per 100,000). Faced with a tight budget and fragmented services Lambeth’s CCG and council have taken the radical step of pooling budgets and services into the Living Well Network Alliance to design, develop and deliver a new model of adult mental health services in Lambeth, of which we are proud to be a part of.

Lewisham

Stretching from the banks of the Thames, in the north, to the borders with Bromley, in the south, Lewisham encompass strong communities who take pride in their local areas and neighbourhoods. Lewisham is one of the greenest parts of south-east London.

 The Health and Wellbeing Strategy for Lewisham identifies mental health and wellbeing as a priority area given there are high levels of mental health need in the borough: Approximately 10-20% of women are affected by mental health problems at some point during their pregnancy or the first year after childbirth.

 There are higher rates of serious mental illness in Lewisham compared to London and England as a whole; one in 16 adults in Lewisham were affected by depression - this is lower than the national average but higher than in London overall; the suicide rate has fallen but is not significantly below the London or national average.

There are high rates of mental health service use:

  • Lewisham has a consistently higher number of patients with severe mental illness on the Care Programme Approach in comparison to the neighbouring boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark
  • Black and minority ethnic (BME) residents are underrepresented in referrals to the local Improving Access to Psychological Services (IAPT)
  • Lewisham residents were more likely to have a high anxiety score on ONS Wellbeing Measures in comparison to London and England overall there is an upwards trend in the number of patients detained under the Mental Health Act in Lewisham.

Within Lewisham there is variable need for mental health services, with the southern wards of the borough (Downham, Bellingham and Whitefoot) estimated to have a 25 - 40% higher need for services, in contrast to more affluent wards such as Forest Hill and Catford South that have lower need than the national average.

Southwark

Southwark is a densely populated and diverse inner London borough situated on the south bank of the River Thames. Home to over 314,000 people, Southwark is a patchwork of communities: from leafy Dulwich, to bustling Peckham and Camberwell, and the rapidly changing Rotherhithe peninsula. It is predicted that by 2026 the population will grow by 20%. It is a young borough with the median age of 32.9 years.

The prevalence of severe mental illness in Southwark is 1.4% (approximately 3,800 patients) and severe mental illness disproportionately affects male, older and black ethnic population groups. Suicide is seen as a proxy for underlying rates of mental ill-health; in 2013/15 Southwark was one of five London boroughs to report higher suicide rates than the national average. Approximately half of the claims for employment and support allowance (ESA) are related to mental health.

Southwark is a home to multiple ethnic groups with just over a half of residents coming from a White ethnic background, around a third from Black ethnic backgrounds and the remaining fifth from mixed, Asian and multiple other ethnic groups. Southwark is 40th most deprived local authority and ninth most deprived out of 32 London local authorities. There is a significant variation in deprivation across the borough with around 38% of Southwark residents living in areas which are among the most deprived nationally. It is estimated that almost one in five adults in Southwark are experiencing a common mental disorder. The prevalence of severe mental illness in Southwark is 1.4% (approximately 3,800 patients) and severe mental illness disproportionately affects male, older and black ethnic population groups. Suicide is seen as a proxy for underlying rates of mental ill-health; in 2013/15 Southwark was one of five London boroughs to report higher suicide rates than the national average. Approximately half of the claims for employment and support allowance (ESA) are related to mental health.